Monthly Archives: June 2013

Gen. James “Hoss” Cartwright (Ret.) And How The Military Talks About Cyberwar

The U.S. military’s former #2 ranked general is accused of leaking Stuxnet details to the press; what he did (and didn’t) talk about is exactly why we all should be discussing cyberwarfare.

As Edward Snowden is holed up in the Moscow airport, the Justice Department is investigating the former second-highest ranking officer in the U.S. military of leaking classified information about Stuxnet to the press. Retired Marine Gen. James “Hoss” Cartwright reportedly received a target letter from the Justice Department saying he is under investigation. The action takes place in the middle of an anti-leak frenzy by the troubled Obama administration: Apart from the techie world of the Ed Snowden disclosures, the ongoing IRS, Guantanamo, and Benghazi investigations have bought both right-wing and left-wing ire aimed at the presidency. Eight other individuals have been charged by the Obama administration under the espionage act since 2004.

Cartwright, the former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is being investigated for speaking to New York Times reporters about ongoing cyberattacks against Iran, which were given the code name “Olympic Games.” The General is one of member of a subculture of high-ranking military officials who regularly speak about cybersecurity and cyberwar. He is an intelligent and perceptive speaker.

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcompany.com/3013668/the-code-war/gen-james-hoss-cartwright-ret-and-how-the-military-talks-about-cyberwar

An Inside Look At The Process Of Making A 3-D Portrait From DNA

Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s creepy Stranger Visions project attempted to create a likeness of a person based just on their DNA. A new documentary digs into how she does it and what her plans are for the future.

Since we first featured the project “Stranger Visions” by information artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg this February, she and her work–which attempts to create 3-D models of faces using genetic material found in stray hairs around New York City–have gotten attention everywhere from NPR to Slate to the Huffington Post. Most recently, the short documentary “DNA Portrait” by Kari Mulholland (and featured on the blog for TED, where Mulholland works as a video editor) serves as a reminder of the ingenuity of Dewey-Hagborg’s work, providing a 12-minute glimpse of what’s going on inside Dewey-Hagborg’s lab (and mind).

“I just kept seeing hairs everywhere,” Dewey-Hagborg says, explaining the project, “and I kept thinking about all these forensic shows that we watch on TV and the fascination we have with that science–the science of trying to figure out from evidence who was there.” The camera explores her process, showing how she maps each sample found with its location in the city and her method of running tests on pieces of hair at Brooklyn community biotech lab Genspace, and gives her a chance to talk about the future of the project, which could include an attempt to use information about age to create more realistic models.

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcoexist.com/1682446/an-inside-look-at-the-process-of-making-a-3-d-portrait-from-dna

How An Umbrella Pushed Pixar’s Aesthetic Into New Territory

Saschka Unseld’s The Blue Umbrella–the photo-realistic short that precedes Monsters University–goes beyond the proven Pixar formula to explore new definitions of animation.

When Pixar’s Toy Story came out in 1995, it almost instantly revived the lost art of feature animation. As it advanced the genre into digital animation, it moved away from old-fashioned stories of princesses singing like Broadway ingenues. Along the way, we became enraptured by the secret lives of toy, cars, monsters, and fish.

It turns out that Pixar, too, is full of formulas. There’s the one famously enumerated by Pixar freelancer Emma Coats, in her 22 Rules of Pixar Storytelling, as they’ve come to be known. And the deservedly praised company has crafted a certain style of animation to which we’ve all grown accustomed: It’s a universe in which Nemo, Sully, and Lightning McQueen might somehow coexist, while the not-quite-human characters are relegated to bit players living in suburban homes just beyond the uncanny valley (unless, of course, they’re stretchy).

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcocreate.com/1683282/how-an-umbrella-pushed-pixar-s-aesthetic-into-new-territory

Watch: A Low-Tech Technique For Making High-Tech Fabrics

The New York-based textile expert has created mesh for Humanscale chairs and reflective gear for Nike apparel. Here, she talks to Co.Design about her process and inspiration.

The pre- and post-work hours of dawn and dusk are prime times for runners to fit a few miles in a busy day; the shadowy visual effect of the sun rising and setting can make it especially tough to see these athletic pedestrians on the move, though, making it a particularly dangerous time to take to the streets. In collaboration with Nike Running, Elizabeth Whelan’s solution was a fabric composed of both glow-in-the-dark and light-reflective yarns, combined together into a variety of patterns that shimmer into action in low illumination.

That’s just one of the innovations from the textile specialist. From a bright, window-lined penthouse in the heart of the Big Apple, she conducts her experiments with warp and weft on a hand-wound, 24-harness, computer-assisted loom, imagines new possibilities from components that range from wool to silk, copper wire to thermoplastics, and comes up with new hues in an on-site dye lab. The RISD grad established her studio almost 15 years ago and has since built up an impressive roster of clientele that includes some of the industry’s biggest names such as Humanscale and Nike.

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672926/watch-a-low-tech-technique-for-making-high-tech-fabrics

The Fascinating, Makeshift Shelters That Occupied Turkey’s Protests

Istanbul architects document the simple, ingenious encampments of #OccupyGezi.

Like recent protest movements that inspired it, #OccupyGezi seemed to have come out of nowhere. What began as an environmental demonstration to dispute the development of Istanbul’s Gezi Park transformed into nationwide protests involving hundreds of thousands. The crowds voiced their discontent with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s leadership, his authoritarian impulses, and the creeping defeat of secularism in Turkey.

By June 1, Gezi Park–one of the last public green spaces left in central Istanbul–was littered with small, informal encampments that the protesters erected with all the spare materials they could get their hands on. The camps were short-lived, but Turkish architect collective Herkes Icin Mimarlik (Turkish for “Architecture for All”) took the initiative of recording, on paper, the spontaneous constructions.

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672916/the-fascinating-makeshift-shelters-that-occupied-turkeys-protests

In The Future, The Whole World Will Be A Classroom

Futurist Marina Gorbis discusses the future of education and how a new “socialstructured” world will change how everyone–children and adults–learns.

Marina Gorbis, author of the new book, The Nature of the Future: Dispatches from the Socialstructed World and executive director of the Institute For The Future, wrote in our Futurist Forum that:

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcoexist.com/1682392/in-the-future-the-whole-world-will-be-a-classroom

New Home Sensors Will Keep You Up To Date On How Much Water And Power You’re Wasting

New additions to the suite of offerings to create the smart home will monitor exactly how all your resources flow in and out of your house (and tell you how to use less of them).

We’re deaf and blind when it comes to the resources we use at home. We get a bill, pay it, and know little else about our water and electricity habits (although plenty of companies will analyze your utility bill for you).

Any home could soon become a “smart home,” however, with a few sensors that attach plug directly into the current infrastructure, says Shwetak Patel, a professor of computer science and electrical engineering at the University of Washington, in Seattle, in MIT’s Technology Review.

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via Fast Company http://www.fastcoexist.com/1682413/new-home-sensors-will-keep-you-up-to-date-on-how-much-water-and-power-youre-wasting

Fleshy piranha plant sculpture casts Mario Bros. in a horrifying light

Fleshy piranha plant sculpture casts Mario Bros. in a horrifying light

Artist Karen, a.k.a. dogzillalives, puts an extra creepy spin on the already freaky carnivorous plants. Her sculpture looks like someone spliced human DNA with one of the piranha plants from Super Mario Bros.

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via io9 http://io9.com/fleshy-piranha-plant-sculpture-casts-mario-bros-in-a-h-623598615

ARP 2600 Blue Meanie S&H 01

via MATRIXSYNTH http://www.matrixsynth.com/2013/06/arp-2600-blue-meanie-s-01.html

The work of G loois

The work of G loois
G Loois is an artist from Bologna who creates highly abstract minimalist work predominantly in monochrome. Check out a selection of his work on walls.

via Juxtapoz Magazine – Juxtapoz Magazine – Home http://www.juxtapoz.com/street-art/the-work-of-g-loois